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What are you praying for this Ramadan? NPR wants to know.

A Muslim man prays at Al Farooq Omar Bin Al Khattab Mosque on April 02, 2022 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
Francois Nel
/
Getty Images
A Muslim man prays at Al Farooq Omar Bin Al Khattab Mosque on April 02, 2022 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Ramadan, the holiest month on the Islamic calendar, begins around March 10.

Muslims worldwide believe this is the month in which God revealed the first verses of the Quran to the prophet Muhammad.

For about 30 days, those who observe will fast from sun-up to sundown. Ramadan holds deep significance as a period of spiritual discipline, reflection, and community.

This year, NPR wants to hear from our Muslim readers and listeners about what are your hopes and prayers are for this month? We invite you to share not only your personal intentions but also reflect on the meaning of prayer within your community. Share your prayer intentions, and you could be featured in the Up First newsletter.

Subscribe to the newsletter to see your answers and get the news you need to start your day.

With your responses, please tell us your first and last name, age and where you're from. Please share a photo if you'd like.

We will be accepting responses until March 9 at 8 a.m. ET.


Your submission will be governed by our general Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. As the Privacy Policy says, we want you to be aware that there may be circumstances in which the exemptions provided under law for journalistic activities or freedom of expression may override privacy rights you might otherwise have.


Copyright 2024 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Majd Al-Waheidi
Majd Al-Waheidi is the digital editor on Morning Edition, where she brings the show's journalism to online audiences. Previously, Al-Waheidi was a reporter for the New York Times in the Gaza Strip, where she reported about a first-of-its-kind Islamic dating site, and documented the human impact of the 2014 Israel-Gaza war in a collaborative visual project nominated for an Emmy Award. She also reported about Wikipedia censorship in Arabic for Rest of World magazine, and investigated the abusive working conditions of TikTok content moderators for Business Insider. Al-Waheidi has worked at the International Center for Religion & Diplomacy, and holds a master's degree in Arab Studies from the Georgetown School of Foreign Service. A native of Gaza, she speaks Arabic and some French, and is studying Farsi.
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