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1A
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1A takes a deep and unflinching look at America, bringing context and insight to stories unfolding across the country and the world. 1A explores important issues such as policy, politics, and technology, while also delving into lighter subjects such as pop culture, sports and humor.

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  • Imagine you're at a dinner party and the conversation turns to the latest news. Everyone has a different opinion. People begin raising their voices.You notice the person beside you isn't talking, they're just watching. They turn to you and make a joke and you immediately relax. You hadn't even realized how tense you were. They then ask what you think about the news. When you respond, they're attentive. When they look at you, you feel seen. They ask you another question and another. Before you know it, an hour has passed, and the arguing has died down around you.Your dinner party partner is what journalist Charles Duhigg calls a supercommunicator. In his new book, "Supercommunicators: How to Unlock the Secret Language of Connection," by the same name, he explores what makes conversations work and how we can all be better at them.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • We've never been here before. A former president is being tried in criminal court while he's running for reelection.Donald Trump faces four separate indictments. And only one of them will go to trial before November. That's a case that got underway yesterday in a Manhattan courtroom with jury selection. Trump is charged with falsifying business documents ahead of the 2016 election to cover up payments he made to adult film star Stormy Daniels.We discuss what the treatment of a former president reveal about our legal system more broadly, and what sets the case in New York apart.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • Almost two years ago, The Supreme Court ruled in the Dobbs case, overturning Roe v. Wade and declaring that access to abortion is not protected in the United States Constitution.A lot has happened in the time since then. Nationwide, citizens are arguing in the courts, legislatures, and ballot boxes over whether abortion should be banned, and if so, under what circumstances.For this week's installment of our weekly politics series, "If You Can Keep It," we take a closer look at abortion and politics. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • The Arizona Supreme Court handed down a landmark abortion ruling this week, invoking an 1864 law that forbids abortions except to save a mother's life, and punishes providers with prison time should they choose to facilitate the procedure.In other judicial news, an appeals court judge has rejected former President Donald Trump's effort to delay his hush money trial as he appeals a gag order.Also from the courts, the parents of a Michigan school shooter were sentenced to 10 to 15 years in prison for involuntary manslaughter.In global news, Joe Biden has spoken out about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's actions in his campaign against Hamas in Gaza.Biden also spent time this week with Japanese officials, promising a new era of strategic coordination this week alongside Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida.And after eight years of deadlock, the European Union passed a new asylum and migration pact.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • What do you remember about being in your twenties? Maybe it was the best time of your life. Maybe it brought challenges that you had to learn to overcome as you entered adulthood.And if you're in your twenties now, life probably looks a lot different for you than it did for your parents. Meg Jay is a psychologist and author. In her new book, "The Twentysomething Treatment: A Revolutionary Remedy for an Uncertain Age," she explores the way our twenties set up the rest of our lives, and how the uncertainties that come with entering adulthood affect our brain.We sit down with her to talk about growing up, becoming an adult, and how our twenties stay with us all our lives.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • We're hitting the open road.There are an estimated 3.5 million freight drivers in the U.S., according to the American Trucking Association.But some of those big rigs could soon be going driverless. Automated 18-wheelers are already hauling freight in Dallas. What's being done to keep those of us sharing the road with these road-bots safe?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • Millions of people watched the NCAA women's basketball tournament over the past few weeks. The last three rounds of the tournament sold out and set viewership records, especially games involving the Iowa Hawkeyes and their star point guard, Caitlin Clark.On Sunday, Iowa faced off against the undefeated South Carolina Gamecocks in the most-watched basketball game on ESPN since 2019. South Carolina pulled ahead in the second half to win it all, 87-75.We talk about how the women's March Madness tournament got so big this year and the role Clark and other star players, like Angel Reese of LSU, played in turning out an unprecedented audience. What's next for women's basketball at the collegiate and professional levels after this year's burst of enthusiasm and viewership?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • With his several divorces, violent rhetoric, and long list of criminal charges, former President Donald Trump may not be your idea of a God-fearing Christian. But that hasn't stopped him from appealing to his Christian base.Roughly 8 out of 10 white Evangelicals supported Trump in the 2016 general presidential election. And a recent Pew Research survey found that among religious groups, white Evangelical Protestants had a more positive opinion of Trump than any other group, whereas the majority of Jewish Americans, Black protestants, and atheists all had an unfavorable opinion of Trump.Despite their outsized political power, the white Evangelical church is shrinking. According to the Public Religion Research Institute, about 14 percent of the population identifies as white and evangelical. That's compared 25 percent in the 1990s.Today, we focus on white Evangelical Christians and the effect they will have on the 2024 election.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • Former President Donald Trump posted the $175 million bond in his New York civil fraud judgement thanks to some help from a supporter. Democrat Tina Smith is pushing to repeal the 1873 Comstock Act because she says it could be "misused" by Supreme Court justices to try to ban abortion nationwide.And the women's March Madness tournament is doing numbers. Monday night's game between Iowa and LSU boasted an audience of 12.3 million people, a record for women's college basketball game.In global news, outrage is echoing through America and the world following an Israeli Defense Force attack on a convoy of World Central Kitchen workers providing aid to the people of Gaza. At least 7 workers died.NATO is putting together a $108 billion fund to help Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy's forces repel a Russian invasion at the country's eastern border.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • The port of Baltimore, one of the nation's busiest, remains partially shut down, more than a week after a giant cargo ship collided with the Key Bridge.Last Tuesday, when the ship hit, eight construction workers were there that night making road repairs. Six workers were killed as a result of the collision.What concerns remain about safety in the port? What impact will this have on the economy, locally, nationally, and abroad?Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Connect with us. Listen to 1A sponsor-free by signing up for 1A+ at plus.npr.org/the1a.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy